TNR Survey Results

In 2020 HSHV conducted a phone survey of past clients that were involved with our TNR program. This was done to give a sense of how well HSHV’s TNR program is doing, as well as to help benchmark the effectiveness of TNR overall.   TNR Survey HSHV conducted a phone survey to help determine the effectiveness of our TNR program for clients who leveraged our program between 2014 and 2017. Questions were designed to help us ...
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Meet the TrapKing

This month we want to highlight this year's Compassionate Feast’s guest speaker, TrapKing Sterling Davis! Sterling Davis embodies the new momentum and energy within the TNR community. Located in Atlanta, Davis founded TrapKing Humane in 2015 as a mobile unit to help community cats. In addition to creating multiple connections within the community to come together to help community cats, he has also brought awareness about TNR to many people through his outspokenness and his ...
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See kittens? Here’s what to do!

It's kitten season! From spring to fall, cats are much more likely to give birth, so you may see kittens outside. Ask yourself: How old are the kittens (see the graphic here for help guessing their age!) Are they in a sheltered area? Do they look healthy?  Is the mom around? If the kittens are less than 5 weeks old, it's usually in their best interest to leave them with mom! The survival rate is ...
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The DC Cat Count

This month, we wanted to highlight a first-of-its-kind study on feral cat populations. In late 2020, the D.C. Cat Count project wrapped up its field work. Over two years, they collected over 6 million photos in the D.C. area in order to figure out how many cats live there. A final result of the 3-year project is set to come out later in 2021. This kind of work is, in our opinion, incredibly exciting and ...
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Bringing outdoor kitties in – When should you do it and how?

We have all faced times when we find an outdoor cat that we think would do well inside. Still, the first question to ask yourself is how likely the kitty would be to even want to be inside. As indoor creatures ourselves, sometimes we assume that all animals would want to be indoors. But cats that come for feeding, and eat near you, but never want you to touch them may love you and still ...
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