ADVOCACY

Together, we can make a difference.

The Issues & Our Positions

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Factory Farming

Despite pictures of happy cows and chickens on packaging, animals raised in factory farms endure intense and sustained cruelty. Michigan has over 270 factory farms.

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Declawing Cats

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Ann Arbor Deer Cull

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Fur Farms

Sandhill Crane, photo by Joan Tisdale

Sandhill Crane Hunt

Lost dog and cat sign

Stray Hold Law

Photo by George Potter on Unsplash

Petting Zoos

Happy smiling brown and white pitbull

Breed Discrimination

Photo credit: Yves Forestier/Sygma via Getty Images

Animals in Research

Action Alerts & Updates

Stop the Michigan Wolf Hunt

Update: On February 24th, 2021 the Senate Natural Resources Committee passed SR 15 and adopted this resolution. Many conservation and animal welfare groups were dismayed to hear this news and will continue to work on this important issue.  Because this resolution encourages the Natural Resources Commission to designate wolves as a game species and establish a hunting season for them, the NRC needs to hear from concerned citizens. We hope you will join us at upcoming Natural Resources Commission meetings, currently virtual. We need your voice! Please help protect Michigan wildlife by writing the Governor here!

Wolves nearly went extinct after being maligned and maliciously hunted.  The federal Endangered Species Act aided in their recovery, but wolves were officially delisted in January by the Trump Administration and no longer receive federal protection.

A wolf hunting and trapping season is not based on the best available science, ignores the will of Michigan voters (who twice opposed wolf hunting initiatives across the state), Michigan’s tribal communities and perpetuates the idea that hunting an animal for a trophy is an acceptable way to interact with our state’s wildlife.

We know wolves are noble, intelligent creatures with strong family ties, and are an essential part of Michigan’s natural beauty and delicate ecosystems.  We also know that wolf population has remained stable but small for a decade, livestock depredations are minimal and there is no documented risk to human safety.  There is simply no justification for a wolf hunt in 2021.

Wildlife nearly everywhere are under great threat as their numbers continue to diminish due to deforestation, climate change, pollution, illegal trade and trophy hunting.  They need our protection!

Please voice your opposition today!  We need you to help Michigan’s wolves recover and prevent the use of neck snares, steel-jawed traps and other brutal forms of hunting.

Stop the hunt of Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes - Photo by John Duncan on Unsplash

Photo by John Duncan on Unsplash

Update: On March 17th, 2021 the Senate Natural Resources Committee favorably passed SR 20. This resolution encourages Michigan’s Natural Resources Commission to designate Sandhill Cranes as a game species and establish a hunting season. We hope you will join us at upcoming Natural Resources Commission meetings, to oppose a Sandhill Crane hunt in Michigan. They need to hear the voices of people who have compassion for animals and want to protect our environment for all to enjoy. We need your voice; please write to our state to help protect Michigan wildlife!

The Michigan Senate Natural Resources Committee voted to pass Senate Resolution 0020 (SR 20) urging the Natural Resources Commission to designate Sandhill cranes as a game species and to open a hunting season on them.

One hundred years ago, Michigan’s Sandhill crane population was near extinction due to hunting and diminishing wetland habitats. The bird’s population recovered at a very slow pace and still remains vulnerable.

Instead of celebrating a successful conservation effort, SR 20 seeks to destroy it!  The hunting of Sandhill cranes serves no wildlife management purpose, does not prevent crop conflict, and reverses conservation efforts by orphaning still-dependent young.

Animal Blood Bank

Recently you may have heard about an animal blood bank in Stockbridge that has acquired homeless animals from Michigan shelters to keep in cages and be repeat blood donors for a year or, in some cases, much longer.  Rest assured that HSHV would never knowingly place an animal with a blood bank, laboratory, or Class B dealer.  Our animals deserve loving, caring homes where they can rest comfortably and move freely.

While our companions sometimes need blood for medical reasons, blood can be acquired through family pets who are volunteered to make a donation as you see here. Forcing a companion animal to live in a cage without a home or family so that other companion animals can get needed medical care doesn’t make much sense.  Further, let’s be clear that no for-profit company is helping the animal rescue industry by taking homeless animals, putting them in cages and profiting off of their blood.  If your veterinarian uses a profit-making model that exploits homeless animals, please encourage them to use pets who can be a part of the program while living in a home with their loving family.

Stop the neverending Ann Arbor Deer Cull

Despite Ann Arbor City Council voting 9-2 to stop it, recognizing many higher budget and time priorities, the deer cull is back in the City budget.

Not only is there not a biological overpopulation, many enjoy deer in the city, and this will be 6 years of deer culls in a 4 year plan. Plus, when the City is facing millions in budget cuts, one wonders why Ann Arbor may continue to spend money on killing healthy deer.

The budget is being presented to City Council April 19th. With many new Council members, we are hopeful the community can share their voice and help them realize how unnecessary and costly the deer cull is.

If you are an Ann Arbor resident who cares about respecting wildlife and finding nonviolent solutions to community problems, please let your City Council Members know you don’t support the cull; here’s a template you can customize. Note: Many Council Members are new and did not vote for the first five years of culling. Like you, many are animal lovers and are looking for solutions that don’t involve violence. Please remember to be courteous in your communication.

Animals can’t speak for themselves; they depend on us.

P.S. Proponents of the cull argue that they must kill deer in order to save their landscaping and the parks’ plants. But we know that’s not true. So we’re bringing “The Deer Doctor,” Sandy Baker back to share her success in deer-proof gardening with the community! See more and sign up for the free workshop at hshv.org/gardenwithdeer. And please share!

Wolf Hunt

Stop the Michigan Wolf Hunt

Update: On February 24th, 2021 the Senate Natural Resources Committee passed SR 15 and adopted this resolution. Many conservation and animal welfare groups were dismayed to hear this news and will continue to work on this important issue.  Because this resolution encourages the Natural Resources Commission to designate wolves as a game species and establish a hunting season for them, the NRC needs to hear from concerned citizens. We hope you will join us at upcoming Natural Resources Commission meetings, currently virtual. We need your voice! Please help protect Michigan wildlife by writing the Governor here!

Wolves nearly went extinct after being maligned and maliciously hunted.  The federal Endangered Species Act aided in their recovery, but wolves were officially delisted in January by the Trump Administration and no longer receive federal protection.

A wolf hunting and trapping season is not based on the best available science, ignores the will of Michigan voters (who twice opposed wolf hunting initiatives across the state), Michigan’s tribal communities and perpetuates the idea that hunting an animal for a trophy is an acceptable way to interact with our state’s wildlife.

We know wolves are noble, intelligent creatures with strong family ties, and are an essential part of Michigan’s natural beauty and delicate ecosystems.  We also know that wolf population has remained stable but small for a decade, livestock depredations are minimal and there is no documented risk to human safety.  There is simply no justification for a wolf hunt in 2021.

Wildlife nearly everywhere are under great threat as their numbers continue to diminish due to deforestation, climate change, pollution, illegal trade and trophy hunting.  They need our protection!

Please voice your opposition today!  We need you to help Michigan’s wolves recover and prevent the use of neck snares, steel-jawed traps and other brutal forms of hunting.

Sandhill Crane Hunt

Stop the hunt of Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes - Photo by John Duncan on Unsplash

Photo by John Duncan on Unsplash

Update: On March 17th, 2021 the Senate Natural Resources Committee favorably passed SR 20. This resolution encourages Michigan’s Natural Resources Commission to designate Sandhill Cranes as a game species and establish a hunting season. We hope you will join us at upcoming Natural Resources Commission meetings, to oppose a Sandhill Crane hunt in Michigan. They need to hear the voices of people who have compassion for animals and want to protect our environment for all to enjoy. We need your voice; please write to our state to help protect Michigan wildlife!

The Michigan Senate Natural Resources Committee voted to pass Senate Resolution 0020 (SR 20) urging the Natural Resources Commission to designate Sandhill cranes as a game species and to open a hunting season on them.

One hundred years ago, Michigan’s Sandhill crane population was near extinction due to hunting and diminishing wetland habitats. The bird’s population recovered at a very slow pace and still remains vulnerable.

Instead of celebrating a successful conservation effort, SR 20 seeks to destroy it!  The hunting of Sandhill cranes serves no wildlife management purpose, does not prevent crop conflict, and reverses conservation efforts by orphaning still-dependent young.

Animal Blood Bank

Animal Blood Bank

Recently you may have heard about an animal blood bank in Stockbridge that has acquired homeless animals from Michigan shelters to keep in cages and be repeat blood donors for a year or, in some cases, much longer.  Rest assured that HSHV would never knowingly place an animal with a blood bank, laboratory, or Class B dealer.  Our animals deserve loving, caring homes where they can rest comfortably and move freely.

While our companions sometimes need blood for medical reasons, blood can be acquired through family pets who are volunteered to make a donation as you see here. Forcing a companion animal to live in a cage without a home or family so that other companion animals can get needed medical care doesn’t make much sense.  Further, let’s be clear that no for-profit company is helping the animal rescue industry by taking homeless animals, putting them in cages and profiting off of their blood.  If your veterinarian uses a profit-making model that exploits homeless animals, please encourage them to use pets who can be a part of the program while living in a home with their loving family.

Ann Arbor Deer Cull

Stop the neverending Ann Arbor Deer Cull

Despite Ann Arbor City Council voting 9-2 to stop it, recognizing many higher budget and time priorities, the deer cull is back in the City budget.

Not only is there not a biological overpopulation, many enjoy deer in the city, and this will be 6 years of deer culls in a 4 year plan. Plus, when the City is facing millions in budget cuts, one wonders why Ann Arbor may continue to spend money on killing healthy deer.

The budget is being presented to City Council April 19th. With many new Council members, we are hopeful the community can share their voice and help them realize how unnecessary and costly the deer cull is.

If you are an Ann Arbor resident who cares about respecting wildlife and finding nonviolent solutions to community problems, please let your City Council Members know you don’t support the cull; here’s a template you can customize. Note: Many Council Members are new and did not vote for the first five years of culling. Like you, many are animal lovers and are looking for solutions that don’t involve violence. Please remember to be courteous in your communication.

Animals can’t speak for themselves; they depend on us.

P.S. Proponents of the cull argue that they must kill deer in order to save their landscaping and the parks’ plants. But we know that’s not true. So we’re bringing “The Deer Doctor,” Sandy Baker back to share her success in deer-proof gardening with the community! See more and sign up for the free workshop at hshv.org/gardenwithdeer. And please share!

Resources

HSHV works with local, state and federal legislators and partner organizations to help better protect animals. Below are some resources. Have a suggestion for more? Email us!

LEGISLATIVE TRACKER

Legislative Tracker

For the latest information on animal welfare legislation as well as HSHV’s position, please see HSHV’s Legislative Tracker.

ADVOCACY TIPS

Effective Advocacy Tips

Courtesy of Jenifer Martin, adjunct clinical instructor at the UM School of Public Health and former HSHV board member

Step 1: Identify the issue you are concerned about

  • Think about the issue at hand and what exactly you want to see changed. Work to gather information on the issue from all sides, including arguments both for and against the change you want to see made.

Step 2: Identify a clear goal for your advocacy

  • Creating a goal that is realistic and will have an impact is one of the most important steps in effective advocacy work. Start off by developing an “ask.” When doing this, consider what it is you want to accomplish. Is it a new law? A regulation? Be as clear as possible about what you are asking lawmakers to do and if appropriate, include the following:
    • Specific legislation involved
    • The lead sponsor of the legislation
    • Timing of any future actions

Sample “ask”: I’m writing to urge you to vote “no” on House bill 5917, sponsored by Rep Vaupe, which would prohibit local governments from enacting rules that regulate pet shops. If this bill passes, any city or county wishing to prohibit pet shops from selling puppy mill puppies would be unable to do so. Ordinances already passed by Michigan cities to prohibit the sale of puppy mills would e revoked. This bill we e considered on the floor of the House next week.

Step 3: Identify the Decision Maker

  • When planning, it is important to think about who is going to be making any decisions regarding the issue you are concerned about. Will it be Congress? Is there a subcommittee? Your local Mayor? Focus all communication and efforts engaging those who will be a part of the decision making process for your particular issue.

Step 4: Affiliate/Build Coalition

  • Strength comes in numbers. Connect with local groups and organizations who share your goal and build and mobilize grass roots efforts. Because elected officials really listen to their constituents, the more stakeholders you can engage in your efforts, the better.

Step 5: Identify Opportunities to Engage

  • One of the most effective ways to bring your issue to an elected officials attention is by engaging with them in a variety of ways. Attending town hall meetings, writing letters, inviting staff to events and conducting in person meetings are all great ways to communicate your goal.

More tips:

  • Be prepared: have information, questions and expertise readily available.
  • Be professional: dress the part! Engage in polite, respectful way and be mindful of body language and your overall approach. Refrain from things like gum chewing and having your cell phone.
  • Be Persistent: offer your assistance, write thank you notes and maintain contact.
FIND YOUR REPRESENTATIVES

Use the links below to find out who represents you. The more your elected officials hear from you, their constituent, on animal welfare issues, the more likely they are to make it a priority for them to address. Your phone call, email or personal visit makes an impact!

Your local representatives

Find your Ann Arbor City Council Representatives

Find your Ypsilanti City Council Representatives

Saline City CouncilPlymouth City Government

Find your Washtenaw County Elected Officials

Your state representatives

Find your Michigan State Representative

Find your Michigan State Senator

Find your national representatives

U.S. House of Representatives: Find your Congressional Representative

U.S. Senate: Contact Michigan Senators Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow

Be an Animal Defender.

 

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